Spanish terms of endearment ❤️❤️❤️

A long time ago, a certain Pamela wrote a short story about Zorro. In it, she used a word, which not exists in original New World , more specifically “querida”. Other authors found it sounded great, so they started using it in their stories. However, there are more Spanish terms of endearment to express your feelings for the other person.

Thanks for Marta Hidalgo for the language validation. ❤️

Spanish Terms of Endearment for Female Lover

We compliment women more often, so we’ll start with the Spanish Terms of Endearment for Female Lover.

abejita – little bee

belleza – beautiful

bomboncita – little candy, sweetie

It is most often used as a nickname for a girlfriend.

bonita – beautiful

chaparrita – shorty

conejita – bunny

flaca/flaquita – skinny

In Spanish, descriptive adjectives commonly become nicknames. In English, it would seem a little awkward to refer to someone just as “skinny,” but this is often done in Spanish.

gatita – kitty

gorda – chubby

This is widely used and although it sounds like an insult, and can be used as one, between lovers, friends, or family it’s used as a word of endearment.

guapa – cutie, pretty

Between lovers or when greeting friends, it’s common to flatter them.

– gorgeous, beautiful

It could be used as a compliment from a stranger. But used between courting couples or lovers it can be used as a show of love.

linda – cutie, pretty, good, nice

This one isn’t reserved only for women as it is in the English language. This word can also be used in exclamation. “¡Qué lindo(a)!” is said to complement anything and anyone, much like “how pretty!” is used in English.

Eres lindo. – You’re cute.
¡Qué lindo está el día, ! – What a nice day it is, dear!

lindura – cutie

luna – moon

– my queen

This is pretty straightforward. It could be used by a husband for his wife.

, ¿qué quieres tomar? – My queen, what do you want to drink?
Cómo estás mi reina, tiempo sin verte – How are you my queen, long time no see.
Le daré una sorpresa de a mi reina – I will give my queen a birthday surprise.

muñequita/muñeca – doll, little doll, honey, sweetheart

nenita – little girl

– girlfriend, fiancée, bride

ojitos – beautiful eyes

pajarito – little bird

paloma – dove

pastelito – muffin

pecas – freckles

– cute, beatiful.

Could be used between novios, courting couple or and can be used to refer to anything beautiful or impressive.

princesa – princess

The endearment can be used with a female partner, daughter, niece, or little cousin

Mi princesa tiene una pijamada con sus amigas – My princess has a sleepover with her friends – daughter meaning
Princesa, quieres ir a la playa el fin de semana? – Princess, do you want to go to the beach on the weekend? – lover meaning

prometida – fiancée

– dear, darling

A common everyday expression in many Latin American countries. One will often see  Juan or  Juana for example in a written or typed letter. It’s the same as “Dear John”, but people use  as a sign of expression just as someone might say “thank you, dear” in English.

ricitos – curly

Spanish Terms of Endearment for Male Lover

bonito – handsome

cariño, cariñito, cari – dear, darling, honey, sweetheart

This is almost exclusively used for a romantic partner. As noun mean hug or cuddle.

 cariño la cena estaba deliciosa. – Thank you honey, dinner was delicious.
 cariño, cómo dormiste? – Hi my dear, how did you sleep?
Feliz . cariñito! – Happy birthday darling!

chaparrito – shorty

flaco – skinny

In Spanish, descriptive adjectives commonly become nicknames. In English, it would seem a little awkward to refer to someone just as “skinny,” but this is often done in Spanish.

gordo – chubby

This is widely used and although it sounds like an insult, and can be used as one, between lovers, friends, or family it’s used as a word of endearment.

guapo – cutie, handsome

Between lovers or when greeting friends, it’s common to flatter them.

Eres guapo – You’re handsome.
Ya llegué, guapo. ¿Vamos a cenar? – I’m home, handsome. Should we go get some dinner?

hermoso – handsome

Mi hombre hermoso – My handsome man

lindo – cutie, handsome, pretty, good, nice

This one isn’t reserved only for women as it is in the English language. This word can also be used in exclamation. “¡Qué lindo(a)!” is said to complement anything and anyone, much like “how pretty!” is used in English.

Eres lindo. – You’re cute.
¡Qué lindo está el día, cariño! – What a nice day it is, dear!

– my king

This is pretty straightforward. When you hold someone in high regard you can refer to them as your King or he is your husband.

Qué quiere desayunar mi rey en su cumpleaños? – What does my king want to have for breakfast on his birthday?
Quieres visitar a tu madre mañana mi rey? – Do you want to visit your mother tomorrow my king?

– boyfriend, fiancé, groom

osito – teddy

precioso – cute, handsome

– prince

Your “prince” may refer to a romantic male partner or a younger loved one like son, nephew or little cousin.

Mi príncipe practica fútbol todos los días después de la escuela. – My prince practices soccer every day after school. – son meaning
príncipe, no te esperaba hoy. – Hello prince, I did not expect you today – lover meaning

prometido – fiancé

– dear

A common everyday expression in many Latin American countries. One will often see  Juan or  Juana for example in a written or typed letter. It’s the same as “Dear John”, but people use querido as a sign of expression just as someone might say “thank you, dear” in English.

tigre – tiger

Spanish Terms of Endearment for Lover (universal)

amor – love / mi amor – my love

Used with the possessive pronoun “mi” (my), this is probably the most commonly used term for your romantic partner.

Feliz mi amor. – Happy Birthday my love
Amor, quieres ir al cine esta noche? – Love, do you want to go to the movies tonight?

amorcito – my love, sweety, honey, sweetheart

ángel – angel

Eres mi angel. – You are my angel.

bebé – baby

Bebé, llegaré tarde a la casa, tengo mucho trabajo. – Baby, I’ll be late home, I have a lot of work.
bebé, llevaré pizzas para cenar. – Hello baby, I’ll take pizzas for dinner.

cielo/mi cielo – honey (literally, my sky, heaven)

Vamos a viajar, mi cielo. – We’re going to travel, my heaven.
Luces esta noche mi cielo. – You look beautiful tonight my sky.
mi cielo, te echo de menos mucho. – Hello my heaven, I miss you so much.

corazón / – heart, my heart, honey, sweetheart,

It’s a nice expression of love while still being relatively casual. Can be used between friends, especially female to male.

 corazón, me alegra verte. – Hello love, I’m glad to see you
Vienes a la fiesta mañana? No puedo corazón, debo trabajar. – Are you coming to the party tomorrow? I can not my love, I have to work.

corazón de melón – honey, sweetie pie

luz de mis ojos – the light of my eyes

media naranja – soul mate/better half

Te presento a mi media naranja. – I’d like to introduce you to my better half.

– my soul

That this isn’t used as lightly as the other cutesy names that lovers use. You’ll want to use this with a significant other who you’re serious about.

Mañana empiezan las vacaciones, . – Vacation starts tomorrow, honey.

mi luz – my light

mi sol – my sunshine, my sun

mi viejo/mi vieja – old man/old lady

This is an endearing way to refer to your spouse in middle age.

A seemingly crass word to us can sometimes more easily be accepted in a playful and lighthearted manner. That’s how viejo and vieja can be teasingly used as fun terms of endearment among friends.

patito – duckling

tesoro/mi teroso – darling, my treasure

/mi vida – my life

A nice expression for showing your loved one how much they mean.

¿Quieres café, mi vida? – Would you like coffee, my love?
 mi vida, cómo estás? – Hello my love how are you?
por el regalo mi vida, me encantó. – Thank you for the gift my life, I loved it.

Sweet Spanish Nicknames for Children and Family

almendra – almond

bebé – baby

bichito – little bug

bizcochito – baby cakes, sweetie pie

burbujita – bubble

, mi burbujita. – I love you, my little bubble.

cachetes – cheeks

cachorro – puppy

campeón – champion

Sometimes children are called that mostly to congratulate them if they do something right.

changuito/changuita – little monkey

chiquis triquis – little “triquis”, honey bunny, baby cakes

¡Felicidades, chiquis triquis! ¡Es tu cumple y te voy a consentir! – Congrats, baby cakes! It’s your birthday and I’m going to spoil you!

chiquito/ – little one, little boy/little girl

A diminutive of the word chico meaning “small,” this pet-name is used to talk to small children and babies.

cielo/mi cielo/mi cielito – honey, my little sky, my little heaven,

This poetic term of endearment is often used with children, but it’s sometimes said between lovers as well.

conejito/conejita – little bunny

This pet name singles out the cuteness of small children. Similarly, any kind of fuzzy animal works as a nickname. For example, gatito/gatita (kitty) and cachorrito/cachorrita (puppy).

corazoncito/corazoncita – little heart

One of the most common terms of endearment for children.

Mira como salta mi corazoncito.– Look at how my little sweetheart jumps.

, dulzura – honey, sweet

frijolito – little bean

gordito/gordita – chubby

This is widely used and although it sounds like an insult, and can be used as one, between lovers, friends, or family it’s used as a word of endearment.

grandullón – big man

Sometimes children are called that mostly to congratulate them if they do something right.

gusanito/gusanita – little worm

jefe/jefa – boss

This nickname is used to refer to the matriarch or patriarch of the family, such as a mother, father, grandmother or grandfather.

Cuando vas a visitarnos, mi jefa? – When will you visit us, my boss? (This is a question a son or daughter could ask their mother, affectionately referring to her as “the boss.”)

lucero – little bright star

mami, Mamá, mamita, mamacita /papi, Papá, papito, papacito – mommy/daddy

Nicknames for parents, but not used only in childhood. People way into adulthood will continue to call their parents mami and papi.

Yo también , mamita. – I love you too, mommy.
Chao, Papi/Mami. – Bye, love.

In some countries (Cuba, Columbia, Caribbean countries, but NOT in Spain, Argentina, Chile, Paraguay and Bolivia) it also refers to an attractive, sexy guy or girl. It can be used to catcall women on the street and is seen as a little coarse in many cases.

mijo/a – A fusion word of mi hija, “my daughter” and mi , “my son,”

This endearing term is often used by older family members who are addressing younger ones, even if they are not actually their son or daughter. Mijito and mijita are common variations.

Mija, te quiero mucho. – Daughter, I love you very much.

mini-me – mini me

mis ojos – my eyes

muñequito – little doll, honey, sweetheart

nene/nena – baby boy/baby girl

This name is used with children. However, sometimes this nickname sticks and people are called nene or nena their entire lives when among family members. Also, it can be used like “babe” or “baby” to refer to a boyfriend or girlfriend.

¡Buen trabajo, nene! – Good job, baby boy!

peque/pequeña – little one

pobrecito/pobrecita – poor little one

This one is said lovingly to someone who has gained your sympathy. It’s often used to refer to someone who’s sick, busy, tired or in various other negative states of being.

pollito/pollita – chicken, chick

princesa/príncipe – princess/prince, princesita – little princess

The endearment can be used with a partner, daughter/son, niece, or little cousin

Mi princesa tiene una pijamada con sus amigas – My princess has a sleepover with her friends – daughter meaning
Mi príncipe practica fútbol todos los días después de la escuela. – My prince practices soccer every day after school. – son meaning
príncipe, no te esperaba hoy. – Hello prince, I did not expect you today – lover meaning
Princesa, quieres ir a la playa el fin de semana? – Princess, do you want to go to the beach on the weekend? – lover meaning

reinita – little queen

This one is usually reserved for young girls.

sirenita – little mermaid

Spanish Nicknames for Close Friends

chico/chica – boy/girl, chicos/chicas – boys/girls

It’s used similarly in the way that English speakers use “hey guys/gals” when addressing a group of friends.

chulo/chula – cutie, cool, nice

This term is used with people of all ages—but only in Spain and certain parts of Latin America. In other parts of Latin America, this can sound old-fashioned or negative. In the regions where it is used, chulo/chula can be used to express interest in someone and when speaking casually with friends, children and others.

Chula, ¿qué te doy? – Cutie, what do I give you?

compa/coma – buddy, pal

Derived from the words  and comadre (godfather/godmother).

cuate/cuata or carnal/carnala – buddy, pal

cuñado/cuñada – brother/sister-in-law

This is also commonly used to refer to a very close male or female friend.

guapo/guapa – cutie, handsome

Between lovers or when greeting friends, it’s common to flatter them.

Eres guapo – You’re handsome.
Ya llegué, guapo. ¿Vamos a cenar? – I’m home, handsome. Should we go get some dinner?

/ – brother/sister

It is commonly used to refer to a very close male or female friend.

/loca – crazy

It is usually used to playfully refer to someone in good humour.

mi viejo/mi vieja – old man/old lady

This is an endearing way to refer to your spouse in middle age.

A seemingly crass word to us can sometimes more easily be accepted in a playful and lighthearted manner. That’s how viejo and vieja can be teasingly used as fun terms of endearment among friends.

pobrecito/pobrecita – poor little one

This one is said lovingly to someone who has gained your sympathy. It’s often used to refer to someone who’s sick, busy, tired or in various other negative states of being.

tío/ – uncle/aunt, dude, mate

In Spain (especially in the Castilian Spanish of Spain, but not in Latin America), it’s extremely common to address your friends, who aren’t actually relatives by blood or marriage, as “tío” or “tía.” It’s analogous to calling someone “dude” or “mate” in English.

vato – dude

It’s very common in Mexico and nearby countries. It’s mainly used between male friends. Unfortunately, there isn’t a female counterpart for this word, and using vato to refer to a woman would probably get you some laughs or strange looks.

Express feelings in Spanish – Spanish Love Phrases

Bésame – Kiss me.

Estoy enamorado/enamorada de ti/vos – I’m in love with you.

Letting someone know that you are in love with them is best said direct. The direct English translation would be “I am enamoured with you” but better don’t use it outside of a 19th-century novel.

Hazme el amor – Make love to me.

Me gustas mucho – I like you very much.

Quédate conmigo esta noche – Stay with me tonight.

Quiero abrazarte. – I want to hug you.

Quiero hacerte el amor – I want to make love to you.

Quiero que me hagas el amor – I want you to make love to me.

Quiero que seas mío – I want you to be mine.

Quiero ser tuya. – I want to be yours.

Se mío esta noche. – Be mine tonight.

Te adoro – I adore you.

– I love you.

This is a much stronger term of endearment than Te quiero and is used between lovers. Amar means “to love”.

Te deseo – I desire you.

If you use this verb you have moved up from simple affection to sexual desire. Be careful using te deseo as it’s very direct.

Te echo de menos – I miss you.

Te necesito – I need you.

Te quiero – I love you.

Literally, “I want you” and can be used in a sentence such as te quiero hablar (“I want to talk to you”).  The Spanish verb querer means “to want”. Te quiero is the most common phrase used to show affection in Spanish. You can use it with a lover, family member, friend, or even pet.

Te quiero besar – I want to kiss you.

Te ves bien / grandioso – You look good / great.

Tu eres muy sexy – You are very sexy.

Tu me vuelves loca. – You drive me crazy.

kasiaeliza

Mama dwójki Zorrątek. Trenuję jujitsu japońskie i kiedyś miałam krótką przygodę z kendo. Lubię RPGi, planszówki, geografię, historię, piłkę nożną i książki. Nie wróć, książki to kocham. :) ----------------------------------- Mother of two Zorro cubs. I train Japanese jujitsu and once had a short adventure with kendo. I like RPGs, board games, geography, history, soccer and books. Wait, come back, I love books. :)

52 thoughts on “Spanish terms of endearment ❤️❤️❤️

  • 31 January 2022 at 22:48
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    We meet many people everyday in our life. We all struggle everyday try to be someone that good to other people life too. We need to appreciate all the people that we met everyday in our life.

    Reply

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